find educational courses in your area

learn with Jan's online workshop

Home » Jan's Weekly Topic » How to stop a dog from “Humping”

Jan's Weekly Topic

Blogs by Category

How to stop a dog from “Humping”

Posted on 29/07/2015
Filed under: Behavioural Issues

dog humping legI was recently shown an article giving advice on how to stop a dog from becoming over amorous, affectionately known as 'humping' and the advice ranged from spraying the dog in the face via a water pistol, castration and attaching a shock collar to the dog and zapping it whenever it made its move. These were quickly supported by the recommendation that the dog is given a lot of exercise which, presumably, would take its mind off of its amorous leanings.  Unfortunately the latter was not accompanied with any practical advice, as to when the exercise is given. Should you immediately start to exercise the dog when it begins to attach itself to the leg of a visitor? This  could prove inconvenient, particularly if you are having a dinner party or barbeque! 

I will refrain from giving all of the reasons that I reject these recommendations, which I consider far from desirable, there are myriad reasons why a dog may indulge itself in this way but instead of going through each of the causes, I will instead provide a practical solution which will always work and above all will be painless, effortless, easy for anyone to do and with  no financial cost.

As the dog makes its move simply take hold of its collar (an ordinary soft one) and take it into another room for 'time out'. Leave the dog there until it is quiet and then allow it back into the room without saying a word, looking at it, or acknowledging the dog in any way. If it returns to the undesirable activity then you simply repeat the removal, again without saying one word to the dog. It usually takes just a few repetitions for the dog to realise that what it is doing results in it being on its own.

For those of you who have larger dogs and feel uncomfortable removing the dog, then just remove yourselves from its presence, perhaps show your guests the garden and leave the dog alone. Again repeat this calmly and the dog will get the message. Many owners have let me know that on about the third repetition, as they go to move the dog, it stops in its tracks and decides that it really would rather be with the family.

Sincerely,

Jan